“What’s your philosophy?”

This question has frequently popped up in my first year as a Financial Advisor. It’s a good and fair question, albeit a loaded one. When I hear that question, I believe most people are referring to investing. If so, the answer is not sexy or surprising – it’s long-term, buy and hold. However, good financial advising is about more than just investing. Real financial advisors look at a client’s entire picture. They take debt, college planning, real estate, insurance, and estate planning into account. However, even here, the answers across planners are pretty standard:

  • Save more than you spend
  • Pay higher interest debt first
  • Invest in a 529 plan
  • Term life insurance is usually better than whole life
  • Have a will and a living trust

Nothing shocking. Execution is often more difficult than the theory but it’s pretty straightforward. Now, you may be asking, “what makes you so special?”

For one — I’m tall, brown, and handsome. Hopefully, that’s enough to gain your confidence but if not, I do have a couple financial philosophies that differ from most advisors.

 

Enjoy your latte and avocado toast

There’s a recent article in Money Magazine titled, Millionaire to Millennials: Stop Buying Avocado Toast If You Want to Buy a Home.

I mean…really? In that article, an Australian property mogul insinuated that folks shouldn’t eat out so much or buy a $4 cup of coffee if they want to afford a house. Well, doing some quick back of the envelope math, sacrificing a latte a day would mean that you would have enough to afford a down payment in San Francisco by May of 2195. That’s 65,000 lattes.

The Money Magazine article reminded me of a story I once heard from Morgan Housel, a Loeb Award finalist for financial journalism. It’s about a guy taking a smoke break with his non-smoking colleague.

“How long have you been smoking for?” the colleague asks.

“Thirty years,” says the smoker.

“Thirty years!” marvels the co-worker. “That costs so much money. At a pack a day, you’re spending $1,900 a year. Had you instead invested that money at an 8% return for the last 30 years, you’d have $250,000 in the bank today. That’s enough to buy a Ferrari.”

The smoker looked puzzled. “Do you smoke?” he asked his co-worker.

“No.”

“So where is your Ferrari?

If you don’t smoke you can substitute coffee for cigarettes and work through similar math. It’s the type of math many advisors use when speaking to colleagues about saving every last buck and letting the magic of compounding interest do its work. However, it doesn’t take into account the simple joys in life. Sure, not buying a pack of cigarettes or a Starbucks a day will save you money. But it may not save you from strangling your boss. Within reason, vices can be good for people; there’s an upside to happiness.

The goal of financial advising should not be to put a stop to happiness but to help you find ways to achieve the life you want. That probably involves a few vices or experiences that just feel good.

 

The market can be beat

Studies have shown that over a 10 year period, more than 85% of fund managers failed to perform better than the S&P 500. These statistics have led many advisors and those in academia to conclude that the market cannot be beaten.

I don’t buy into what academia attempts to preach. Imagine if a medical student was told that no matter how hard they try; they will just be a mediocre doctor. Investing and portfolio management is probably the only subject matter where professors will tell their students that it’s impossible to be better than average.

All the statistics tell me is that mutual fund managers cannot beat the market. I believe individual investors can.

Mutual funds have a tougher battle than individual investors. Fund companies have to hire portfolio managers, research analysts, compliance folks, sales teams, and accountants. These people cost money and they are paid through the contributions from investors, therefore hindering investment returns.

There is also unbelievable pressure for those funds to outperform the market on an annual or even quarterly basis. Therefore, stocks are being bought and sold frequently, not giving a sound investment idea time to perform. Fund managers also face pressure from their bosses to go with the herd. A couple years ago, every manager was all-in on Apple stock. However, when signs of slowing growth started to emerge at Apple, the stock declined nearly 30% from its highs. Many of the funds that were overweight in Apple struggled. However, those managers weren’t going to lose their jobs because, “hey, it’s not my fault — everyone was invested in Apple.” Had the stock gone up 30% and a manager was not invested in the popular company, they may be on the hot seat. Of course, Apple recovered but the point is that it’s tough for fund managers to go against the grain. As an individual investor, you do not face that same pressure.

You as an individual investor can avoid Wall Street’s outrageous fees and short-term pressures. Your edge is that you have the advantage of time. Your investments don’t have to be better than the competition every year or quarter. You can own great companies and give them time to run.

Now, don’t get me wrong. I’m not saying that beating the market is what you should be trying to do. As an individual investor, you should try to do well enough to achieve certain goals such as retirement or paying for your children’s college education. This can often be done by just investing in a diversified mix of low-cost index funds. This alone will likely lead to better returns than 85% of mutual funds. However, investing in high-quality individual stocks alongside those index funds can be a great way to enhance returns.

Is your 401k optimized to help you meet your retirement goals? Are you paying too much in fees for under-performing funds in your retirement plan? A 14-year Vanguard study showed a good financial advisor can add up to a 3% value to its client — a difference of $500,000 for someone maximizing their 401k over 20 years. Click below to schedule an appointment for a FREE 401k evaluation.